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  #16  
Old 29 May 2009, 17:11
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davidw davidw is offline
 
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Real name: David
I just caught me a decent rainbow last weekend when I went fly fishing on the river near where I stay sometimes. I only got to fish for twenty minutes as they started generating at the lake. I'll have to post a pic of that sometime.
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  #17  
Old 29 May 2009, 17:21
KevinL KevinL is offline
 
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Spanish food is soooooooo good!!! Reall Spanish food is awesome!!! Like you have pointed out! Now I am starving...

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  #18  
Old 29 May 2009, 17:38
MrEyes MrEyes is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
I am half Spanish, so I am somewhat biased....

hmmm, where to start...Google them
  • A well made tortilla
  • Paella (personal preference to the meat based variety (chorizo))
  • Pata Negra (cured ham)
  • Papas Bonitas and Mojo
  • Salt cured cod
  • Turron & Mantecados
  • Churros
  • Pulpo al Aljillo (Garlic & Octopus)
  • Fabada Asturiana
  • Gofio
  • Bienmesabe
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  #19  
Old 29 May 2009, 17:40
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Real name: Gerry
Originally Posted by MrEyes View Post
I am half Spanish, so I am somewhat biased....

hmmm, where to start...Google them
  • A well made tortilla
  • Paella (personal preference to the meat based variety (chorizo))
  • Pata Negra (cured ham)
  • Papas Bonitas and Mojo
  • Salt cured cod
  • Turron & Mantecados
  • Churros
  • Pulpo al Aljillo (Garlic & Octopus)
  • Fabada Asturiana
  • Gofio
  • Bienmesabe
I love Chorizo, and i remember having Churros for Breakfast
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  #20  
Old 29 May 2009, 17:56
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Lynne Lynne is offline
 
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Real name: Lynne
That Paella looks really, really good. I'll admit to hardly ever having Spanish food. We have such a wide variety of other types of foods here - lots of Mexican, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, etc - but no Spanish restaurants that I can recall. I think I may try cooking that Paella though this weekend (probably without the squid rings cuz I don't recall seeing those at our local grocery).
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  #21  
Old 29 May 2009, 18:31
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Lynne View Post
That Paella looks really, really good. I'll admit to hardly ever having Spanish food. We have such a wide variety of other types of foods here - lots of Mexican, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, etc - but no Spanish restaurants that I can recall. I think I may try cooking that Paella though this weekend (probably without the squid rings cuz I don't recall seeing those at our local grocery).

I think we've just started VB.orgs International Spanish Weekend 2009 and i've changed my sig to suit

Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 29 May 2009 at 18:49.
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  #22  
Old 29 May 2009, 18:36
Biker_GA Biker_GA is offline
 
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Lynne, look for an Oriental grocery store. They should have squid there.
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  #23  
Old 29 May 2009, 19:27
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
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Real name: Gerry
Heres my recipe for Tonight.

Dedicated to everyone who always wanted to try some lovely spanish recipe, but could not bear to be without their egg and chips Now you'll be able to turn your hand at this very popular spanish dish to be eaten hot or cold.

Tortilla (Spanish omelette)


Spaniards are somewhat obsessed with tortilla, and rightly so. It's pretty simple - just a set omelette with potatoes and onions - but when done right it's really delicious. Cookery book explanations are never quite right. So to continue with our Spanish Food Thread and dedicated to all those people that have wanted to try spanish food, but never got any further than egg and chips

Further to those recipes you get in books and online, nothing can quite match personal experiance, The cooking times and proportions of egg to potato are often wrong, tending to produce a rather dry tortilla. And they often fudge the process of flipping the tortilla over (or even tell you to stick it under a grill).

Another problem is that the Spanish concept of frying and the British/americian way are a little different. When Spaniards fry, they use quite a lot of oil, whereas people in Britain/usa tend to try to use as little oil as possible (which kind of defeats the purpose of frying ).

Like many things, I wouldn't usually measure the ingredients when making a tortilla, as it's all about proportions rather than absolute volumes. All you have to do is make sure that you have a few more eggs than you think you need. However, the last time round I decided to measure everything and make a note of it - the quantities below make one good-sized tortilla.

It's also difficult to be precise with cooking times. The perfect tortilla should be a little runny in the middle. However, some people prefer theirs more well-done, and if you're taking it on a picnic you may also want it to be a little firmer.

Ingredients

Plenty of olive oil
1 medium-sized onion, peeled and thinly sliced
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed or very finely chopped
1 kg of potatoes, peeled and quite finely chopped
8 large eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon of salt

Method

Place the onions and plenty of oil in a medium-sized non-stick frying pan, heat gently, and fry until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, and cook for another minute or so. Place a colander over a large bowl, strain the onions and garlic through it, and return the oil to the pan.

Add the potatoes to the pan, and add more oil if required, so that the potatoes are just about covered. Heat gently, with the lid on, so that the potatoes are both frying and steaming at the same time.



Once the potatoes are cooked, strain them in the colander containing the cooked onions. (The oil which gathers in the bowl below can be reused.)

Allow the potato and onion mixture to cool for a few minutes, then add the beaten eggs and the salt, and mix well. If the mixture looks too 'potatoey', add another beaten egg.

Return a little of the oil to the frying pan (just enough to form a very thin layer on the bottom), heat it gently (being careful not to let it get to hot), pour the omelette mixture into the pan, turn heat to minimum, cover and cook for about 10 minutes, until the bottom and sides of the omelette have set, but the top is still runny.



Flip it over using one of the methods described below, and finish cooking for another 3 minutes on a low heat. Flip the tortilla out of the pan onto a serving plate.

This is the Fun Part!!

The flip

One of the scary bits of making a tortilla for the first time is how to flip it over when it is halfway through cooking. Here are three ways of doing this.

Method 1: Two Pans

This is my method. I have two identical pans. When the tortilla is cooked underneath, I put a little bit of oil in the second pan, place it face down on top of the first one, hold the two together (using oven gloves!) and flip them over. The tortilla thus ends up face down in the second pan, ready to continue cooking.

Method 2: One Pan - Two Plates



This is an adaptation of the traditional Spanish method, made a bit easier for us. When the tortilla is ready to flip, place a large dinner plate face down on top of it and flip it over (using oven gloves) so that your tortilla is now cooked side up on the plate. Now get another plate, place it face down on top of the raw tortilla, and flip again, so that the tortilla is raw side up on the second plate. Finally, put the frying pan face down over the tortilla, and flip so that the tortilla is raw side down in the pan, and carry on cooking.

Method 3: One Pan - One Lid

This is the authentic Spanish method. When the tortilla is cooked underneath, place a large frying pan lid face down on top of it and flip it over (using oven gloves) so that your tortilla is now cooked side up on the lid (As in Method 2.) Now slide it back into the frying pan so that it is raw side down, and carry on cooking.



So there you have it guys, another cheap and cheerful Spanish recipe, which you can have hot or cold

Enjoy

Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 29 May 2009 at 19:41.
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  #24  
Old 30 May 2009, 21:36
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
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Real name: Gerry
Did anyone have a bash making the Paella this weekend,



Tommorow i'm going to tell you a great recipe which you can make very easily and serve for Breakfast or have as a snack,


Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 30 May 2009 at 22:11.
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  #25  
Old 30 May 2009, 21:47
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Lynne Lynne is offline
 
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Not yet. I haven't gone to the grocery store yet. Things have been rather hectic in my house for the last two weeks.
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  #26  
Old 30 May 2009, 22:05
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Lynne View Post
Not yet. I haven't gone to the grocery store yet. Things have been rather hectic in my house for the last two weeks.
Nevermind lynne, When your ready, I was going to wait until tommorrow for the next treat, but its making me feel too hungry, so without further ado heres a little something you guys can make for Breakfast tommorrow morning.

Its really easy, and every well stocked kitchen should have the ingrediants, nothing special required!!

Churros



Spanish Churros are very similar to doughnuts without the yeast. If you don't have a churro maker you will need a piping bag with a large fluted nozzle. Churros make a nice accompaniment for hot coffee or chocolate, an essential part of a Spanish breakfast In Spain they are sold at fairs and festivals cooked freshly shaped in loops. They can also now be found in many food stalls at show grounds, theme parks, and cafes around the world. Now you'll be able to have them for your Breakfast Tommorrow

They are very easy to do, lets do it.....

Portions: 6 Portions

Preparation: 15 minutes

Cooking: 10 minutes

Ingredients

400ml water
1 tbsp sunflower oil
pinch salt
250g flour
1 egg, beaten
oil for frying

To Serve

caster sugar

Method

Batter: Bring the water to the boil in a saucepan with the salt.
Add all the flour to the boiling water and beat it until it comes away from the sides of the pan.
Remove the pan from the heat and allow it to cool slightly.
Add the egg to the dough and beat it in until it is well combined.

Churros: Spoon the batter into the piping bag and pipe out 10cm long churros, into you have used all the batter.

To Cook: Pour oil in a deep frying pan so that it is 5 cm deep, place it over a high heat. When the oil is very hot reduce the heat to moderate.



Place 3-4 churros in the pan and cook them for 3-5 minutes, turning them halfway through cooking, the churros should be pale golden.
Remove them from the oil and drain them on kitchen paper. Serve or keep them warm while you prepare the remaining churros.

To Serve: Serve the churros hot coated in caster sugar or serve with caster sugar for dipping.



Enjoy

Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 01 Jun 2009 at 18:30. Reason: Auto-Merged DoublePost
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  #27  
Old 01 Jun 2009, 08:03
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Aexo Aexo is offline
 
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Nobody called "Mantecados". Everyone call "Polvorones". It's tipical Christmas.

I love Fabada Asturiana... mmmm...
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  #28  
Old 01 Jun 2009, 17:57
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
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Real name: Gerry
Originally Posted by Aexo View Post
Nobody called "Mantecados". Everyone call "Polvorones". It's tipical Christmas.

I love Fabada Asturiana... mmmm...
Well thanks for that Aexo, Now we know

Another little treat i'm going to tell you Tonight is a Treat and what a treat it is

Its Turrón

Turrón is a very old, traditional sweet of Moorish (Arabic) origin. Turrón has been a popular sweet for centuries, even outside Spain’s borders. It is said that the Moors invented turrón over 500 year ago in Jijona, a small town about 30 miles or so north of Alicante.

Jijona’s economy is focused on the production of turrón and there is even a museum of turrón that chronicles the process and history of the sweet. In addition, it is located within the factory that makes both “El Lobo” and “1880” brands of turrón. If you are lucky enough to visit the museum from mid-June to mid-December, you can watch the turrón production from a balcony high above the factory floor.

There are two traditional basic types of turrón. Soft Jijona or turrón blando, which is so smooth it has the consistency of peanut butter and hard Alicante or turrón duro, which is like a thick almond nougat candy, similar to peanut brittle.

Tonight on VB.org i'm going to show you haow to make 2 examples of turrón, the first is

Turron de Jijona (soft nougat)

Ingredients :

1 dessertspoon cinnamon
250 gms sugar
250 grams white honey
250 grams toasted almonds
250 grams toasted hazelnuts
5 egg whites



Chop the nuts finely and then crush them in the mortar until they become a smooth paste
Beat the eggs whites stiffly and then add them to the paste
Put the honey and sugar in a saucepan and bring to the boil
Add the paste to the honey mixture
Mix constantly with a wooden spatula for ten minutes
Remove from the heat, put into wooden moulds lined with rice paper
Leave to cool and then sprinkle with cinammon

So easy guys, i can see you making this soon, Now we come to the next type of Turrón, Its a more harder type, almost like a peanut crunch

Turron de Alicante (hard nougat)

Ingredients:

1 kilo Rosemary Honey
500 gms sugar
2 egg whites
1,500 gms almonds, heated up in oven
1 lemon



Slowly heat the honey in a saucepan until all the water that it contains has evaporated.
Add the sugar and mix with a wooden spatula
Beat the egg white until stiff and then add to the mixture.
Stir briskly with the spatula for eight to ten minutes then stir slowly over a low flame until it begins to caramelise (turn brown)

Put the hot almonds into the honey mixture with the rind of the lemon
Mix well and let cook slowly for a few minutes taking care it does not stick
The mixture is then poured into wooden moulds lined with rice paper
After two and a half hours, the turron is cut. When it is completely cold, the slices are stored in an airtight container.

Thats it for tonight Enjoy Amigos

Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 01 Jun 2009 at 18:25.
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  #29  
Old 01 Jun 2009, 19:59
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Aexo Aexo is offline
 
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I think that you went to spanish at christmas, isn't it? Tell me when you visit asturias and I'll invite you to "chorizos a la sidra" and a big "cachopo". Do you know cachopo?
To drink... Sidra asturiana
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  #30  
Old 01 Jun 2009, 20:49
UKBusinessLive UKBusinessLive is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Real name: Gerry
Talking

Originally Posted by Aexo View Post
I think that you went to spanish at christmas, isn't it? Tell me when you visit asturias and I'll invite you to "chorizos a la sidra" and a big "cachopo". Do you know cachopo?
To drink... Sidra asturiana
Chorizo in Cider and...

Una foto del Cachopo con un móvil al lado para que os hagáis una idea del tamańo:



and



Sounds good to me I might take you up on that Aexo




Last edited by UKBusinessLive; 01 Jun 2009 at 20:56.
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